Mindfulness Tricks to Reduce Anxiety

Source: https://www.pexels.com/
Source: https://www.pexels.com/

What is anxiety?

It is the body’s natural reaction to stress. It is apprehension or fear about what is to come. Most people are fearful and nervous on the first day of school, going to a job interview, or giving a speech.

However, if your anxiety symptoms are severe, last for more than six months, then you may have an anxiety disorder.

What are anxiety disorders?

It is normal to be stressed about moving to a new location, starting a new job, or taking a test. Although this type of anxiety feels unpleasant, it may motivate you to work harder and do a better job. Ordinary anxiety is a passing feeling that does not interfere with your daily life.

In the case of an anxiety disorder, you may experience fear all of the time. It is intense and, at times, hindering.

This type of anxiety can cause you to abandon activities that you enjoy. It may prevent you from entering an elevator, crossing the street, or even leaving your house in extreme cases. If the anxiety is not treated, it will worsen.

Mindfulness Tricks to Reduce Anxiety

Anxiety can drain your mental energy and have physical consequences. But, before you become anxious about being anxious, know that research has shown that simple mindfulness practice can help you reduce your stress and anxiety.

Mindfulness is about being aware of daily life signs and the things we usually ignore. It’s about lowering down the volume in your mind by returning to your body.

Don’t worry. You don’t have to invest an hour of your pay on a class or contort your body into awkward positions. You are likely already have everything you need to practice mindfulness. Use these tips to incorporate short bursts of mindfulness into your day to reduce anxiety and calm your mind.

Set an intention

There is a cause why your yoga instructor instructs you to set an intention for your practice that day. Setting a purpose, whether in your morning journal or before essential activities, can help you concentrate. Set an intention for something that causes you anxiety, such as giving a big speech at work.

For example, before going to the gym, you can intend to take care of your body or treat your body with kindness.

Participate in a guided meditation or mindfulness practice

Apps and online programs are excellent ways to get a taste of practice without committing to an expensive class or devoting a lot of time. There are numerous free guided meditations available online.

Color or doodle

Allow yourself a few minutes to doodle. You’ll get your creative juices flowing and give your mind a rest. Is drawing a source of stress for you? Invest shamelessly in a coloring book, adult or otherwise. You’ll have the benefit of being able to complete a task without having to face a blank page.

Go for a walk

Being outside helps with anxiety. Pay attention to the feel of the wind on your skin, the sounds around you, and the smells. Keep your phone away in your pocket or at home, and try to stay present by focusing on your senses and surroundings. Start with a quick walk around the block and see how you feel.

Wishing for other people to be happy

This one is from author and former Google pioneer Chade-Meng Tan takes only 10 seconds. This is a purely mental practice. You do not need to tell the person; set the positive energy. Try it on your way to work, at the office, at the gym, or while waiting in line. Bonus points if you are annoyed or upset with someone and then (mentally) wish them happiness instead. Meng, who has been nominated for eight Nobel Peace Prizes, could be onto something.

Lookup

Not just from your phone, laptop, or whatever screen is in front of you. Whether you’re taking out the trash or arriving home late, take a few deep breaths into your belly while gazing up at the stars. Allow the universe to remind you that life is more significant than your worries or your inbox.

Brew on it

Making a cup of tea is a valued ritual in many cultures around the world. Set yourself up for success by concentrating on each step of the process. When you pull out the leaves, how do they smell? What color is the water when you first add the tea? Sense the heat of the cup on your hand as steam rises from the cup. If you have the time, sip your tea without being distracted. Don’t you like tea? This practice is simple to do while making rich, aromatic French-pressed coffee.

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